Essays Topics For Ged

If you want to take the HSE (high school equivalency) exam you must be sure that you are prepared perfectly. Check tips from online HSE classes about types of essay topics used during the exam.

The HSE essay component will require you to compose a well-structured essay of roughly 200 to 400 words in a time frame of no more than 45 minutes. Here you can read also about online GED® courses.

An effective and good essay requires a robust dissertation statement backed by research in some well-formulated paragraphs that are created around a specific kind of rhetorical approach. Though the TASC-HiSET-GED essay topics can vary greatly, we can distinguish four key kinds of subjects: narrative, descriptive, informative or persuasive. When you have become familiarized with these varieties of topics, and when you have a good strategy ready for each class of topics, you can be sure to be properly prepared to be successful on the HSE essay part.

Narrative Topics

Narrative topics want you to come up with a private story or encounter. These types of topics could very well by asking questions like: “Think of an event you will definitely never forget about,” or “Explain something about an experience that taught you something fundamental.” This type of questions is asking you to tell a personal story and require a narrative strategy.

This implies that you need to learn to write an introduction paragraph, that ends with a thesis that expresses the precise experience or matter you came to understand. Every subsequent paragraph will indicate why and how the encounter was essential and you will produce examples of the value of the encounter in your personal life.

Descriptive Topics

Descriptive questions are asking you to give an explanation of a person, a place, a thing or an idea in descriptive details. For instance, a subject that will be taken care of best with a descriptive essay could be: “Persons you find at the zoo” or “Our favorite treasures” or “The most horrible food I ever ate” or a subject matter that instantly reminds you of a description. When you are writing on a descriptive topic, it could be helpful to identify several distinct characteristics of the topic and devote one paragraph to the description of each characteristic.

Persuasive Topics

Persuasive topics want you to write an essay about your personal thoughts and opinions on a controversial subject. A typical persuasive subject could be: “A lot of people feel the age for drinking alcohol really needs to be dropped to 18 for the reason that the age at which you can vote is 18 and not 21.” An additional persuasive topic could well be: “People should not be allowed to smoke outdoors in public places.” A persuasive topic is expecting you to develop an approach to agree or disagree with a subject in a brief, well-organized essay. It is sensible to rehearse setting up persuasive essays on many different present-day situations and concerns.

Informative Topics

Informative topics want you to write about a procedure or process. A good illustration of such an informative topic is: “Describe how to produce a cake” or “Present the best way to write an application letter.” A very effective technique for producing an essay on an informative subject is splitting up the process or procedure in several (3 or 4) pieces and spend one paragraph on each element of the process. For instance, an informative essay on the production of a cake could talk about reading the recipe and getting the required tools, finding the ingredients, determining the various ingredients, and mixing and preparing the batter.

 

 

Most of the GED Reasoning Through Language Arts (RLA) exam is multiple-choice, but there is also one “Extended Response” question. This question requires you to write a short essay in response to two passages of text. The passages will present two different viewpoints on a topic. You must read both of the passages and then decide which argument is best supported. Your essay should include evidence from the passages that shows that one of the authors better argues the issue.

Please note that you are not to write about which opinion is correct or which opinion you believe to be true. You are only asked to analyze each passage and support an argument of which passage best supports its claims. You will have 45 minutes total to read the prompt and the viewpoints given, and to draft your essay.

Essay Quick Tips

  • Use paragraphs beginning with topic sentences to separate major ideas and to better organize your argument.
  • Utilize logical transition words to seamlessly move from one paragraph to the next.
  • Use correct spelling and proper grammar.
  • Vary your sentence structure and incorporate appropriate, advanced vocabulary words.
  • Stay on topic! Produce an outline prior to beginning your essay to organize your thoughts.

Essay Scoring

Your GED essay will be evaluated across three areas:

  • Analysis of Arguments and Use of Evidence.
  • Development of Ideas and Organizational Structure.
  • Clarity and Command of Standard English Conventions.

The task may seem intimidating, but you more than likely already have these skills! Your essay will receive three scores — one for each of the listed areas.

Since you have 45 minutes, you must make sure to effectively utilize your time; this is best accomplished by practicing essays under the same 45 minute time limit.

Writing Guidelines

Rely upon these timing guidelines as you write your GED essay:

  • PLAN — Spend 10 minutes reading the source material and organizing your essay response.
  • PRODUCE — Spend 30 minutes writing your (ideally) 5-paragraph essay.
  • PROOFREAD — Save 5 minutes for re-reading what you wrote and making necessary changes and improvements.

Remember, since you are typing your essay on the computer screen, proofreading and editing can be done much more quickly than if you were reading over a handwritten essay! Five minutes may not seem like much, but you should be able to read the entire essay over at least once and correct any obvious spelling or grammatical mistakes.

Pro-tip: Don’t start writing until you have every paragraph planned out! Outlining your argument is the best method for producing a coherent and cogent response.

Since the GED RLA extended response is graded by the ACS (Automated Scoring Engine), it is relatively easy to score well if you rely upon a good template from which to organize your essay. Here are a few quick tips regarding clarity to help you score as highly as possible on the GED RLA Extended Response:

Essay Template

Paragraph 1 — Introduction

Start with a 1-sentence general statement regarding the topic. Show that you understand the argument(s) by identifying the topic and its significance, and then presenting a bold and concise thesis statement; this can also be your major claim with regard to the arguments. Consider the following example thesis:

Though the first argument highlights important considerations regarding (the topic of) ________, ultimately the second argument is better supported and more convincing.

Paragraphs 2, 3, and 4 — Body Paragraphs

When you plan your essay, you should devise your thesis (choosing which side you found to be best-supported), and carefully lay out three major reasons why it is best-supported.

Use specific examples to support your point of view. Pull selections from the argument you are stating is best supported, and explain why they are good supporting examples, or why they make valid points of consideration.

Each body paragraph should only focus on one major idea, and the 1–2 selections from the passage that support that idea. Try to keep the paragraphs between 4–6 sentences so that they are succinct, direct, and clear. Avoid excessive wordiness; sometimes more is not better!

Paragraph 5 — Conclusion

In 2–3 sentences, wrap up your thoughts, reiterating the correctness of your thesis (why the argument you chose is better supported), and perhaps leave the reader with an idea of WHY they should give more consideration to the topic. You can also use the conclusion to offer a degree of concession to the other argument, perhaps admitting that there are one or two good qualities to the other argument, before reiterating that the argument you selected is ultimately better supported and more convincing.

Finally, don’t worry about choosing the “wrong” side. It doesn’t matter which side you choose, or which argument you choose to say is better-supported, just be sure that you can quote specific examples from the source texts to support your ideas!

Now, review our sample prompt and practice writing an essay!

GED Essay Prompt >>

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